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Best Day Trips from Prague That You Will Love

As one of the most beautiful cities in Europe, Prague is definitely worth a visit. But did you know that there are several incredible places close to Prague which you can see in a day or less? If you have some extra time during your stay in Prague, you can take a day trip to see fairy tale castles, charming towns, beautiful cities and natural attractions.  Still not convinced to spend a day outside of Prague?  I have put together a list of the best day trips from Prague plus information on how to get there with help from a few of my fellow travel bloggers.

Best Day Trips From Prague

Day Trips and Tours from Prague
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Kutna Hora

Saint Barbara Church in Kutna Hora - Top 10 day trips from Prague
Contributed by Aurelia from Daily Travel Pill

A day trip from Prague to Kutna Hora, a charming small town, is the perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of the capital city.  Kutna Hora is a beautiful city and it has a lot to offer in terms of tourist attractions and culture. Visiting it will show you another side of Czech Republic.

One place you shouldn’t miss when in Kutna Hora is the Sedlec Ossuary. This Gothic church is the resting place of more than 40,000 people but there is more to it than that. The bones have been used to decorate the church and they form intriguing chandeliers and decorations.

Make sure to also visit the Saint Barbara’s Church. The structure is pretty impressive and the church itself has been included in the UNESCO Heritage Sites.

For those with a sweet tooth, a stop to the Chocolate Museum is a must too! When hungry, make a stop at the famous Dacicky Restaurant and try the delicious Svickova.

How to visit Kutna Hora from Prague:

You can easily visit Kutna Hora from Prague by train which takes 1.5 hours. Kutna Hora is located about 82 km from Prague about 1 hour by car. You can also book a half day or full day tour from Prague.

Karlstejn Castle

Karlstejn Castle, one of best day tours from Prague

Contributed by Rachel from Rachel’s Ruminations

Karlstejn Castle makes a great day trip from Prague. Perched on a wooded hill above a small village, it looks like something out of a fairytale. Built in the 14th century by the King of Bohemia, Charles IV, it was intended as a safe place to store the crown jewels and valuable religious relics, which it did for a couple of centuries.

The jewels aren’t there anymore, but, in a way, they are: chapels inside two of the towers, where the crown jewels were kept, are set with precious stones and painted with frescos from the Middle Ages.

Karlstejn can only be visited by guided tour. It gets very busy, so it is wise to book in advance for “the sacred rooms of the castle with the Chapel of the Holy Cross” tour, a.k.a. the “exclusive tour,” which includes the highly-decorated chapels.

Read more about Karlsteyn Castle here.

How to visit Karlstejn Castle from Prague:

A train from Prague’s central station takes 40 minutes to get directly to Karlstejn village. From the station, it is about a half-hour walk uphill through the village to the castle. Alternatively, a van and a horse-drawn carriage shuttle visitors up the hill, starting from the parking lot nearby the train station. There are also several half-day and full-day tours available.

Cesky Krumlov

esky-Krumlov-in-Winter-Snow-Czech-Republic

Contributed by Allan Wilson from It’s Sometimes Sunny in Bangor

Any trip to the Czech Republic is not complete without a visit to Cesky Krumlov, found on the riverside of the Vltava River, and under the medieval background of a 13th Century castle. And while I would always recommend Cesky Krumlov for longer overnight stays, it is still possible to cover on a day-trip from Prague. And any visit would start with the Historic Centre of Český Krumlov which is central to the maze of cobbled streets and squares which are dotted with quaint Bohemian bars and taverns which come to life through the day with grog, traditional music and medieval feasts. It feels like a Bohemian City still stuck in the past. There is also just enough general sightseeing to cover in a day which include the State Castle and Chateau (UNESCO site) and the Baroque and Renaissance architecture and charm found throughout the old stone alleys. And while the city is well-known now on the backpacker trails these days, we found Cesky Krumlov in winter to be completely void of tourists.

How to visit Czesky Krumlov from Prague:

To reach Czesky Krumlov from Prague there are buses that take between 2-3 hours there and back, and then there are less regular trains with the latest return in the early afternoon to Prague, so the bus will always be the best for the day-trip.

Ceske Budejovice

Ceske Budejovice

Contributed by Daniela from Ipanema travels to

Although it’s the major city in the South Bohemian Region, České Budějovice remains a bit off-the-beaten track, overshadowed by the touristy Český Krumlov. Founded in 1256 by Ottokar II, King of Bohemia, by the 17th century České Budějovice became the most important city in the region.

Today, the historical heritage of the city is present everywhere: in the grand city square with the beautiful Town Hall, and the Samson Fountain – a real eye-catcher, or around the Dominican Monastery and the Church of Presentation of Virgin Mary – the oldest buildings in the city (13 c.). Another iconic building in the city – The Black Tower, a 16th-century watch tower – offers a stunning bird’s-eye view of the city. In the summer, České Budějovice is a paradise for the boat lovers – the two rivers Vltava and Malše get together at the city, making boating one of the most popular recreational activities.

Beer lovers won’t be disappointed in České Budějovice either, as the one of the most famous beers in the world – the Budweiser, is produced there. The brewery offers daily tours where you can learn everything about how beer is made and why the American Budweiser is not the same thing as the Czech one.

How to visit České Budějovice from Prague:

České Budějovice is an easy day trip from Prague. You can reach the South Bohemian capital from Prague either by bus or by train. The RegioJet buses depart from the Prague’s Na Knížecí bus station. The trip takes a bit more than 2 hours. There are also regular trains from Prague’s Central Train Station to České Budějovice. By train it takes also a bit more than 2 hours. If you travel by car, the distance is only 150 km.

Karlovy Vary

Karlovy Vary - A Great Day Trip from Prague

Contributed by Alex Waltner from Swedish Nomad

Karlovy Vary (also known as Karlsbad) is one of the most famous spa destinations in Europe, and it has long been a place where rich and famous have come to pamper themselves. In total, there are about 300 smaller hot springs, whereas there are 13 main sources where the water is being pumped up through wells.

The city is also known for its architecture, which dates back to the Renaissance and later periods. When you do visit, you can also drink the “health water” with special spa mugs where you drink from a straw which is built into the mugs. The water comes from various wells and have a different set of temperatures and minerals.

And last but not least, Karlovy Vary is also a great place to try the Czech Beer Spa, which has become famous worldwide.

How to visit Karlovy Vary from Prague:

It’s also very easy to go here from Prague, and you have several choices of transportation including train, bus, day trip, taxi or rental car. The journey takes only 2 hours, but due to limited parking space, I suggest to go by bus, which costs 159 CZK with Flixbus.

Marianske Lazne

Colonnade Marianske Lazne

Contributed by Carol Perehudoff from Wandering Carol

As spa towns in the Czech Republic go, Karlovy Vary may be more famous, but Marianske Lazne, a spa town, is one of the most stunning destinations in Europe and well worth a visit.

A walkable town, with pale yellow neoclassical buildings and elegant colonnades, it was a favourite with royalty, and during its heyday in the 1800s, it was patronized by the big names of the day such as the King Edward VII, Czar Nicholas II of Russia Emperor Franz Joseph I.

Today, it’s popular with spa goers and tourists who come to see sights such as the famous Singing Fountain, which has 250 water jets that move and dance along with music and lights. The colonnade, with its shops and vaulted ceiling is another must-see attraction, and at the Cross Spring Pavilion next door, visitors can taste the mineral springs that put Marianske Lazne on the map as a healing destination.

How to visit Marianske Lazne from Prague:

To reach Marianske Lazne from Prague, you can take the train from Prague Hlavní Nádraží Station. It takes about two hours and twenty minutes. From there, it’s about a 30 minute walk to the historic spa centre or you can take bus #5.  You can also book a day tour that combines a visit with Karlovy Vary.

Mělník

Mělník Short Day Trip From Prague

Contributed by Chrysoula from Historic European Castles

While Prague has so much to offer travellers that you may not even want to leave the city, there are also loads of great day trip options from the Czech capital that are well worth a visit. Mělník is one such destination that should be on the bucket list of every traveller visiting Prague, not least because it lies just half an hour from the city centre.

Mělník is a medieval town dating back to the 5th century that played an important role in the country’s trade and agriculture. Today it still produces much of the country’s food and wine, which travellers can witness while enjoying a wine tasting tour at the Mělník Chateau.

Other sites of significance in and around Mělník Old Town include Church of Saints Peter and Paul (with a bell tower lookout), the Zámek Nelahozeves castle, the Mělník Underground Well and simply walks along the Vltava River.

How to visit Mělník from Prague:

Mělník is an easy day trip option from Prague as it is accessible by bus, car and train and takes between 30 minutes and one hour. You can also book a tour here.

If you wish to take the bus, you will need to head to one of Nádraží Holešovice and Ládví stations in Prague and ask for a bus to the Mělník Bus Station. This journey takes around 40 minutes (depending on traffic) and is the cheapest option with tickets costing around 50 CZK.

Taking the train is another public transport option, with the journey from Prague Central Station to Mělník Train Station taking around one hour.

Alternatively, you could drive or take a taxi to Mělník. Mělník is located around 30km from Prague and the roads are fairly quick and easy to navigate. A taxi from Prague to Mělník is likely to cost around 600-1000 CZK.

Pilsen

Pilsen Guided Day Trip from Prague

Contributed by Albina from Ginger around the Globe

Pilsen is notoriously known for beer. The famous Pilsner was invented here in 1842 and it is possible to book a tour in the brewery where the magic happened. This is something that Pilsen is very proud of, so it is recommended to go around the town and try the beer atmosphere in local pubs with pilsner beer.

Other than that, Pilsen is a historical city, so don’t forget to walk around the city center. It is also possible to visit Pilsen’s dungeons, which is the less known but very popular thing to do. If you feel like swimming around here, in the north part of the city, there is a huge lake, where it is possible to swim in the city. In the winter there are amazing Christmas markets and perhaps explore the local church and synagogue. For science and museum lovers, there is a great museum called Techmania Science Center. It is generally possible to try here a lot of things people might know from basic physics or chemistry lessons.

How to visit Pilsen from Prague:

Pilsen is generally easy to reach. There are buses going there every hour from Zličín station or Florenc station. But maybe for better access to the city center is better to go by train which costs about the same as a bus (100kč).

Dresden, Germany

Dresden is one of the day trips from Prague to other countries

Contributed by Marta and Milosz from BackpackersRWO

Dresden is often called the Pearl of the Baroque or Florence on the Elbe. Dresden was largely destroyed during the Second World War, but now it is almost entirely rebuilt.  The most beautiful and most recognizable place in Dresden is the Zwinger Palace. You can enter the courtyard, terraces for free. The City Sky Liner offers a beautiful view of the Palace as well as the Dresden skyline for 8€ per adult.

The second must-see in Dresden is Altstadt. The best way to explore it is to walk around the old town, look at the buildings, stop at one of the crowded restaurants and cafes, ride a horse-drawn carriage or walk along the Elbe River and admire the coast and the river steamers. One of the most recognizable city attractions is the Fürstenzug mural, located at Augustusstraße. This painting has a length of more than 100 meters, and it is painted on 25,000 ceramic tiles.

How to visit Dresden from Prague:

The most convenient way to get to Dresden from Prague is to take a FlixBus. A one-way journey takes around 2 hours, and the prices start from 14.90€. The second option is to take a train. The journey takes approximately 2 hours, and the costs of a one-way ticket start from 24.90€.

Brno

St. James Ossuary in Brno

Contributed by Wendy Werneth from The Nomadic Vegan

Even though Brno is the second-largest city in the Czech Republic, it’s often overlooked by visitors to the country. This is one of its advantages, as it offers a much more authentic slice of Czech life than overtouristed Prague.

There are plenty of things to see and do in Brno, and yet it’s also quite compact for its size. All the sights are within easy walking distance, so you’ll be able to see a lot even on a quick day trip.

One of the most popular places in Brno among locals and visitors alike is the Zelný Trh, which means “Cabbage Market” in Czech. The market has been in operation for about 700 years, and it sells a lot more than just cabbage! It’s a great place to wander around, soaking up all the sights and smells, and there’s usually an ice cream truck parked on the square selling delicious vegan ice cream.

Another popular spot is Špilberk Castle. Getting there requires a bit of a climb, but you’ll be rewarded with great views of Brno from its ramparts. And in addition to these more mainstream sights, Brno also has some unusual attractions, such as the St. James Ossuary and the 10-Z Fallout Shelter.

How to visit Brno from Prague:

RegioJet trains ply the route between Prague and Brno, as do bus companies like FlixBus and Eurolines. Both options take about 2.5 hours. Prices can be incredibly cheap, depending on how far in advance you book, so check to see which company has the best deal.

RELATED – Planning a trip to Europe soon? Make sure to check out our Europe Packing List for all the travel essentials for Europe.

Olomouc

Olomouc one of the best day trips from prague by train
Contributed by Veronika from Travel Geekery

Olomouc is the 6th largest city in the Czech Republic nestled in the heart of Moravia region in the East of the country. Its beautiful Baroque Old Town is the main draw, but the city offers much more from large parks, cultural events to general ‘laidbackness’ as a nice contrast to Prague. It helps it still remains largely undiscovered.

Right in the city center you can admire an astronomical clock. That’s right, Prague’s astronomical clock is not the only one! The beautiful city hall gets surrounded by markets during festive times of year. A Unesco-listed Marian Plague Column amazes with its sheer size.

Beautiful churches and cathedrals are scattered all within a stone’s throw away from each other. The whole wide city center is easily walkable. There’s a lot to see on foot. You can e.g. trace all the 6 Baroque fountains coming from the 17th and 18th centuries.

Olomouc has also its local food specialties, such as the infamous Olomoucké syrečky, also called tvarůžky. It‘s essentially a ripened cheese that smells rather bad but many people like its flavor. You can taste it in selected meals in local restaurants, as well as buy a little cheese block from a store.

How to visit Olomouc from Prague:

The most convenient way to get to Olomouc from Prague is to take a train. It takes 2 – 2.5 hours depending on which company and type of train you choose.

Liberec

Old Town in Liberec

Contributed by Karolina Klesta from Lazy Travel Blog

Liberec is one of the best day trips from Prague. Fall in love with Czechia’s fifth-largest city with its rich history as a part of Bohemia and a new home for German migrants during the 14th century. Take a walk through its centre where you will be surrounded by charming 19th century buildings and colourful houses. Surrounded by the Jezira Mountains, venture to the peak to see the Jested Tower, a futuristic structure that houses a hotel, restaurant, and television tower. Whether you have cycled up the hill or taken the scenic route via the cable cars available at the foot of the highest summit, take a break at the restaurant and enjoy the stunning view with your meal. For travelers with kids, a trip to the Babylon Aqua Park, with its waterslides, caves, and laser games will make you the coolest parents in the world.

How to visit Liberec from Prague:

Liberec is about an hour from Prague by car.  The fastest public transportation option is the bus which takes less than 2 hours.  There are also trains to Liberec as well but they are about an hour longer.

Litomyšl

Litomyšl

Parampara & Parichay from Awara Diaries

Litomyšl is a quaint little town to the east of Prague, about 2-3 hours away from the capital. Unlike Prague, Litomyšl is less crowded and offers a variety of options for tourists, including culinary delights, heritage attractions like the Litomyšl Castle and the Monastery Gardens. You can also enjoy the intriguing sculptures by Olbram Zoubek in the Litomyšl Castle premises which considered to be a significant piece of Czech art. Nature lovers will enjoy taking long walks in the woods. You can also enjoy quick meals, great coffee and live entertainment across the many cool cafés in the Old Town area. Litomyšl is a bag full of surprises with more to wander and discover as you walk across this gorgeous town. It’s what one would call the #InstaPerfect Day Trip. You might feel tempted to book one of those many cute Penzions, some which come with wine cellars and stay the night whilst enjoying the vibe of this lovely Czech town.

How to visit Litomyšl from Prague:

Getting to Litomyšl from Prague is easy. You can take a train from Prague to Litomyšl via Chocen which takes about 3 hours. Or you could opt to drive there across a scenic route, which takes approximately 2 hours.

Pardubice

Pardubice Town Square
Contributed by Fiona Maclean from London-Unattached

Interested in Beer, Heritage or Horses? Pardubice should be on your radar. This tiny historic city is particularly known for two equine associations. The nearby village Kladruby, a short cab drive away, is the home of the national stud. The tradition of horse breeding in Kladruby nad Labem stretches back to at least the mid 14th century and the Old Kladruber horse is the cousin of the Lipizzaner. And Pardubice itself is famous for an annual steeplechase which takes place in October. But, if you prefer history to horses, you’ll find plenty to explore in Pardubice which was a flourishing city in the 14th century under the rule of the Lords of Pernštejn. During that time the city also became known for the production of beer and lager. By 1650 there were two main breweries, the castle and the town brewery, which competed with each other. The town brewery survives today as the Pardubice brewery – with buildings you can tour that were extended and modernised in 1871. Famous for Pardubice Porter, first introduces in 1890 it was the strongest bottle fermented beer in Europe! So take an excursion to Pardubice and find out more for yourself.

How to visit Pardubice from Prague:

The easiest way to reach Pardubice is by train – it’s less than an hour direct from Prague and will cost you around 4 euros!

Lipno Lake

Lipno Lake
Contributed by Anya Kay from Road is Calling

Lipno Lake, located 220 km south from Prague, is considered to be the largest (even though artificially made) lake in the entire Czech Republic. It is bordering Austria and Germany and is relatively easy to get to. Ideally, it would be better to plan a trip here for two days but many visitors still manage to make it a one day trip from Prague.

This Lake is a perfect spot for everyone who loves yachting, windsurfing, hiking, cycling, roller-skating and in general active living. The tourist season here never ends and you can find something interesting to do at any time of the year.

Due to its unique location and enormous size as well as fairly frequent strong winds, Lake Lipno creates perfect conditions for many water activities including surfing. It is often called the sea, because the waves sometimes reach a height of two meters, with a wind speed of 22 meters per second!

Those who are looking for more action can go rafting or kayaking. Others who prefer something calmer can rent a catamaran or boat. Multiple paths, with a total length of over 200 kilometers, give an opportunity to jog, bike or simply enjoy a slow walk.

All the necessary equipment can be rented here, and if you want to take a short training course in yachting, kitesurfing, and windsurfing, instructors are on-site all day long.

How to visit Lipno Lake from Prague:

The best and the most convenient way to get to Lipno Lake is by car. The best towns to go to are Frymburk and Lino nad Vltavou.

Bohemian Switzerland National Park

Pravcicka Gate in Bohemian Switzerland National Park one of the best day trips from Prague
Contributed by Derek Hartman from Robe trotting

One of the ultimate day trip destinations from Prague is Bohemian Switzerland National Park. It’s not in Switzerland, it’s in the northern part of the Czech Republic. The national park got its name from two popular Swiss artists who first made note of the area in their work. They thought the region reminded them of their native Switzerland and the name stuck.  Overall, the views are the star of this amazing national park. Following are some of the highlights:

The Gorges of Kamenice

The ideal visit to Bohemian Switzerland National Park includes hiking the Gorges of Kamenice. These gorges were carved out of sandstone and left behind a lush green valley and a lazy river surrounded by moss-covered rock walls. The views are stunning and the natural beauty of the gorges is a highlight of the park. It’s easy to book a gondola ride to float down the river.

The Bandit’s Keep

Hiking out of the gorge, you should make sure to see Saunstejn, also known as the Bandit’s Keep. This spot is the remains of a castle that was built to protect Bohemian trade routes. After the castle fell to ruin it was said to have been taken over by bandits. They used the vantage point to plan attacks on trade caravans that the castle was originally built to protect.

Pravcicka Gate

There aren’t many food options, but most hikers stop for lunch at the U Forta Hotel. Even most tour options include food and beverages at the hotel because it’s the base of Gabriela’s Trail. It is the most popular hike in the park and takes you to the pinnacle of the Bohemian Switzerland National Park. After about 6 kilometers, you reach the brilliance of Pravcicka Gate. This 16-meter tall sandstone arch has a distinctly flat top which resembles a bridge. It was even featured in The Chronicles of Narnia as well as the Instagram feed of almost everyone who has hiked the park.

Bastei Bridge

From Pravcicka Gate you are about 1 kilometer from the German Border and Saxon Bohemian National Park. There you will see the majesty of the Bastei Bridge over the Elbe River. The bridge offers more spectacular views and was built by linking rock formations in the mid-1800s.

How to visit Bohemian Switzerland National Park from Prague:

The best way to reach the park is by driving. It’s about a 90-minute drive from Prague and there are many tour options if you are considering a guided day tour. Most of the hiking is easy to moderate, but if you plot your own course, you can find a more challenging trek.

Bratislava, Slovakia

Staré Mestro, Bratislava, Slovakia

Contributed by Coni from Experiencing the Globe

Prague is an amazing city, but no matter when you visit it, it’s always crowded. Why not take a day to explore a different, much more relaxed capital? Bratislava has always been overlooked, but it has tons to offer!

Staré Mestro, Bratislava’s Old Town, is the heart of the city. Get lost in the little cobblestone alleys and look for art. You’ll find real sized statues all over. The most known one is Čumil, also called ‘Man at Work’, a testimony to Slovakians. While wandering, don’t miss the 14th century Michael’s Gate, the gothic St. Martin’s Cathedral and the classicist Primate’s Palace. Surrounding the center, you’ll find Bratislava’s Opera House, the rococo Grassalkovich Palace, and the Church of St. Elisabeth (known as the Blue Church). For the best views of the city, head to the UFO observation deck –in a clear day you can even see Vienna in the distance. Overlooking the old town, Bratislava’s Castle stands tall. This hilltop baroque building is now a Museum of History.

How to visit Bratislava from Prague:

The easiest way to get to Bratislava from Prague is via train, from the city’s main station (there’re also buses, but the journey takes an extra half an hour for about the same price). With almost 4 hours, it’s a long ride for a day trip, but it’s worth it (although staying overnight would make the excursion even better).

Vienna, Austria

best day trips from Prague to Vienna

Contributed by Riana Ang-Canning from Teaspoon of Adventure

One of the best trips from Prague is to Vienna because this city is full of beauty, history and lots to see and do. While Vienna is a little far from Prague for a day trip (it’s four hours one-way), this awesome city is well worth the long commute. If you only have a day, you can take one of the first trains out of Prague and arrive in Vienna mid-morning. Fuel up on coffee at one of the famous Viennese cafes, perhaps one frequented by Mozart or Freud? Start your exploration of Vienna with a stroll around the Old Town.

You can visit the Hofburg Palace and the beautiful St. Stephen’s Cathedral. Grab a quick lunch of wiener schnitzel of sausage, both Vienna favourites, and then head out to Schönbrunn Palace. The best part about this palace is definitely the beautiful grounds. Spend a couple hours exploring the gardens, fountains and maze! Back in the city centre, take in one of Vienna’s famous shows either at the Vienna Opera House, the Lipizzaner Horse Show or the Vienna’s Boys Choir. After the performance, you’ll have just enough time to grab dinner (locals swear by liver dumpling soup) before you catch the train back to Prague.

How to visit Vienna from Prague:

The best way to get to Vienna from Prague is by train or bus. It’s a direct train (no changes) and takes four hours each way. The bus takes between four and four and a half hours.

As you can see there are many incredible places in the Czech Republic (and a few other countries!) that you can visit on a day trip from Prague. Let me know in the comments below which of these amazing day trips from Prague appeals to you the most and why.

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